You Are Strong: Don’t Let Burnout Win

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Is burnout starting to creep its way into your professional life? Dr. James Turner is here to remind you that you are strong and you can overcome this.

Do you remember what it took to ace all those standardized exams in high school and college? The strength it took as a medical student to approach patients with confidence under the watchful and judging eyes of experienced physicians?

As a physician, you have demonstrated your strength time and time again. In the fight against burnout, your strength is an invaluable skill.

If you feel you’ve lost that strength, Dr. Turner can help you reclaim it. Register for his free live webinar tomorrow evening to find out how.

This article was originally published by The Physician Philosopher.

 

You Are Strong: Don’t Let Burnout Win

 

You-are-strong

 

You Were Strong in College

 

You were strong enough to get through weed-out classes in undergrad.  You were strong enough to balance the extra-curricular activities and clinical shadowing expected of you while crushing a 21-hour semester.  You were strong enough to say, “no, I have to study” when friends wanted to go out because you had a dream of becoming a doctor someday.

You were strong enough to pay for the applications, fight for the interviews, and earn your way into a matriculating medical school class.  You were strong enough to defy the odds.

 

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You Were Strong in Medical School

 

You were strong enough to withstand the rote memorization required in gross anatomy and biochemistry. You were strong enough to take on a seemingly insurmountable amount of debt.

You were strong enough to put on that white coat for the first time when it felt like the weight of the world’s responsibilities now rested on your shoulders. You were strong enough to wear that same short white coat that labeled you a learner when you met your first patient on clinical rotations.

You were strong enough to say, “I know not.”

 

You Were Strong in Residency

 

You were strong enough to get through medical school and to match into residency.  You were strong enough to face the long hours and sleepless nights.  You were strong enough to put your head down, be a good soldier, and do what you were told.  You were strong enough to miss weddings, funerals, and reunions.

You were strong enough to hold the hand and remember the name, age, face, and family of the first patient you ever lost.  You were strong enough to tell her daughters of their loss – and strong enough to cry in front of them.

You were strong enough to come to work the day after; the next patient needed your help, too.

 

You Were Strong as an Attending

 

You were strong when you became an attending physician.  You were strong when everyone looked to you to make the decision.

You were strong enough to deal with the imposter syndrome that you felt would consume you.  You were strong when you were certain people would eventually figure out that you were a fraud.  You were strong because you felt that strength was required of a good doctor.

You were strong the first time you made a difference or saved a life.  You were strong when you gave the credit to the team.  You were strong even when you received no credit at all.

You were strong because your patients needed you to be strong.

 

You Were Strong When Burnout Came Knocking

 

You were strong when you lost your autonomy for the first time along this journey to becoming a doctor.  You were strong when your empathy began to fade.

You were strong when you felt overwhelmed by stress.

You were strong enough to deal with an insurance company dictating your patient’s medical care.  You were strong enough to deal with the administration’s demand to increase your clinical workload and RVU production.

You were strong enough to deal with the new electronic medical record system that was clearly meant for billing and not patient care.  You were strong enough to stand up for your patients when obstacles got in the way of their care.

You were strong when you felt like a data-entry clerk.

You were strong the first time that you felt like quitting medicine. You were strong the first time you heard a fellow physician died by suicide.  You were strong enough when you realized that the same doctor was a prior friend, classmate, or co-worker.

You were strong even when you felt weak, depressed, and at the end of your rope.

You were strong when your family asked why you were coming home late.  Again.  You were strong enough to deal with marital stress and missed soccer games and recitals.  You were strong when you got called back to the hospital – knowing that your kids would ask why they were the only ones who didn’t have a parent at their school show.

You were strong enough when the stress caused you to become a patient, too.

 

You Are Still Strong Today

 

You are still strong enough today.

You are strong enough to talk with your boss, therapist, or a counselor.

You are strong enough to say no.  You are strong enough to consider a change or to cut back your clinical hours at work.  You are strong enough to know that you are valuable. You are strong enough to know you have options.

You are strong enough to realize that you are the master of your thoughts, feelings, actions, and results.  You are strong enough to realize that once you’ve done the work, you can change your circumstances, if needed.

You are strong enough to know that you should not have to choose between being a good doctor, spouse, and parent. You are strong enough to be able to mean it when you say that you are living the dream.

You are strong enough today to realize that asking for help isn’t a sign of weakness. It is a sign of strength. You are strong enough to realize that you cannot do this on your own.  You are strong enough to know that open and honest transparency will help fix this problem.

You are strong enough to realize that your life matters, too. You are strong enough now to ask for the help that you know you need.

 

You are strong enough to know that we need strong doctors just like you.  

 

Burnout and moral injury are largely caused by systematic failures of the medical system.  Burned-out physicians are not to blame, and resilience training doesn’t make sense for a group of people who are already resilient and strong.  However, we cannot expect our broken medical system, or it’s administrators, to fix itself overnight.

For now, we might have to find solutions on our own.

So, if you are a medical student, resident, or attending physician battling burnout or depression  – please ask for help and seek options you might be able to control.  One of the most powerful tools that I have found has been group and one-on-one coaching for doctors.  You are not alone. However, it begins by having the strength to ask for help, or to make a change.  Doing so isn’t weak.  It is courageous, brave, and strong.  Just like you.

 

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Don’t forget about that live webinar with the author! 11/1 at 8:30 pm Eastern / 5:30 pm Pacific.

Webinar Registration

 

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5 thoughts on “You Are Strong: Don’t Let Burnout Win”

  1. I needed to read this after working last evening in the ED at one of the hospitals hacked by ransomware in the country.

    Having to resort to all paper charts, unable to view any imaging studies except on the portable machine and having to wait extended times for any CT or ultrasound reads , unable to look up previous visits, allergies- absolutely no access whatsoever on the computer (going on a week now with no end in sight). Add COVID on top of this and all the staff are beyond tired and frustrated.

    However this was a nice reminder of what we have already made it through. In the last few years cutting back my shifts has made a huge difference and living below our means takes off a significant burden. I also found some help online with a lot of the free content from a PhD named Dr. Amy Johnson (dramyjohnson.com). I found her website through another financial blog. She offers a different way to view and treat anxiety, depression, bad habits, etc that have helped me. I have no financial relationship to her site or anything, just personally found it helpful.

    Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  2. Subscribe to get more great content like this, an awesome spreadsheet, and more!
  3. I’m starting to feel a bit like I’m at a time share sales event.

    I appreciate what you are all doing, but the hard sell via email and podcasts over the past week is a bit overwhelming.

    Reply
    • Feels like a soft sell to me, JB. Just putting Dr. Turner’s newly available services out there so they reach the people that might benefit the most from them. Most people, including you and me, are not in that group.

      But I don’t know that the sales tactics have been aggressive, and the only pressure is the time pressure of the first group starting soon.

      Best,
      -PoF

      Reply

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