Top 10 Financial New Year’s Resolutions to Make (and Keep) in 2019

Physician on FIRE has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Physician on FIRE and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities.


Happy New Year!

Have you made your New Year’s Resolutions yet?

If you said yes, have you broken your New Year’s Resolutions yet?

I usually wait until mid-to-late January to break mine, but I I’d like to give you some achievable New Year’s Resolutions that you can keep.

Each of these ten items will help you improve your financial situation, and most of them are something you can do, check off the list, and move on. I’m not asking you to make any drastic changes in habits, like my good-beer-loving friend across the pond who’s giving up beer for a year.

I’m simply suggesting you figure a few things out when it comes to your financial well-being. Your wallet will thank you for it.

 

 

Top 10 Financial New Year’s Resolutions to Make (and Keep) in 2019

 

#1. Calculate Your Net Worth

 

This is a great place to start. If you want to set financial goals for yourself, it helps to know where you’re at, first.

It’s not a complicated equation. You add up your assets, subtract your liabilities, and the result is your net worth.

People get hung up on what should and shouldn’t be included. Vehicles? Jewelry? Art? Football cards? You can get as specific as you want, but if it’s a depreciating asset and/or its value is < 1% of your net worth, I wouldn’t bother counting it.

I’ve got lots of football cards and other junk. Any jewelry my wife owns has more sentimental than monetary value, and that monetary value is a drop in the bucket compared to our invested assets. Our vehicles might be worth $30,000 combined, but they cost money to operate and will depreciate as we use them. I don’t count any of it. when I calculate our net worth.

I do count the value of all our investment accounts and properties owned.

We’re debt-free, but if you’ve got mortgage debt, student loan debt, credit card debt, or any other debt, those go in the liabilities column.

I don’t have a pension coming, but I should receive Social Security eventually. I don’t include this in my calculation, but if you’re near retirement and your pension or Social Security appears to be a sure thing, you can find a calculator to estimate the value of that benefit as a lump sum in today’s dollars if you so choose.

I do count the value of my home and any money set aside for college (529 Plans) in my net worth, but not in my retirement assets. If you’re married with combined finances, you should be looking at your net worth as a family, as we do.

The fine details aren’t all that important. Just figure out where you stand today and monitor that number at least annually to ensure you’re headed in the right direction.

Passive Income MD recently asked, “Should You Track Your Net Worth?” My answer is yes.

 

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#2. Track Your Portfolio

 

Again, we’re just wanting to figure out where we’re at. What do we own? In which accounts? How are these investments performing?

You may have investments in a half-dozen places: IRA, 401(k) or 403(b), HSA, 457(b), 529 Plan, cash value life insurance, defined benefit plan, etc…

It’s helpful to look at everything at a glance in one place. I do this in two ways, and I suggest you do one or the other or both.

First, I use a spreadsheet. I manually enter each of my assets and the account in which they’re held. At least once per quarter, I update the value of each asset. I’ve set it up to calculate the overall asset allocation across the board and tell me which classes are underweight or overweight compared to my desired asset allocation. It helps with rebalancing and looks pretty.

The downside is that it took a lot of work to set up and takes some work to update. I can save you the setup work by giving you a universal portfolio tracking spreadsheet. It’s up to you to enter your funds and the asset classes they’re holding, but the sheet will do the rest.

Enter your email, and I’ll send you a copy. I’ll also send you new emails alerting you to new posts, but you can opt out of those and into a weekly digest or opt out entirely as soon as you’ve got your sheet. No hard feelings.

 

 

Second, I use Personal Capital to see what’s happening across my accounts on a more regular basis. On any given day, I can log-in to see my current net worth, asset allocation in greater detail, overall performance among all accounts, within each account, or for each asset.

It’s got a fee analyzer to show what you’re paying in 401(k) fees and a retirement calculator to show if you’re on target to have a successful retirement (I am!).

Personal Capital pairs very well with the spreadsheet because it will log in to all of you accounts and display all of the balances on one screen, making updating the spreadsheet so much easier.

They do have an advisory service that costs money — I don’t recommend it — and they will advertise that service to you if you sign up and use the free financial software. There’s a reason they can offer such a robust service “for free.” They do make good money off a small percentage of people who sign up and choose to use them as a financial advisor.

Nevertheless, I have been happy using the website and app for the last four to five years. I was using it and recommending it long before I had a website of my own.

 

#3. Track Your Spending

 

Once again, if you want to know how you’re doing financially, you need to keep track somehow. Since spending is a key component of both your savings rate and your required nest egg to consider yourself financially independent, it’s important to know how much you spend on a monthly and yearly basis.

You can do this as loosely or accurately as you want. Before I had a blog, I knew what our credit card bills looked like and how much came out of our checking account for large expenses like property taxes.

Without actively tracking our spending, I knew that most months, we were spending $5,000 to $6,000.

Once I had a blog, I started tracking it more closely to prove to the world and myself that we were indeed financially independent. What I learned was confirmative. Using Mint.com initially and Personal Capital more recently, I’ve learned that our expenses are indeed in the range of $5,000 to $6,000 a month.

Now, I have a better idea of where the money goes, broken down by category. You can see my last two annual spending reports below.

 

When you pay closer attention to where the money goes, you can more easily identify areas in which you could potentially save money, and you can ensure that your spending is well aligned with your priorities.

 

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#4. Write an Investor Policy Statement

 

It sounds fancy and complicated, but this is something you should be able to accomplish fairly quickly. It can be as simple as you’d like it to be.

Start with a desired asset allocation. List the accounts you’ll be investing in. You can build it out from there.

Being closer to retirement, I’ve included some basic elements of our drawdown strategy. While unnecessary if you’re decades from retiring, it’s a good idea to start thinking about how you’ll be accessing your hard-earned money when you do need it eventually.

If you’ve already written an IPS, an annual review is a good idea. The tax code changes; sometimes your job or income changes. If you haven’t looked at yours in over a year, it’s a good idea to review and perhaps revise the living document as needed.

If you need some guidance, I’ve written a few posts detailing my own IPS, why it says what it says, and how it has changed. And yes, it’s due for a review and possibly some revision.

 

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#5. Increase Your Savings Rate

 

When physicians ask how much they should be saving annually, I generally recommend they try to live on half their takehome pay. In other words, save and invest as much as you spend.  When it comes to student loan debt, I think of debt paydown as a form of saving and investing; you’re improving your net worth and getting a guaranteed return.

If you can do this, you’ll go from broke to a financially independent and work-optional state in about 15 years or so, depending on market conditions.

If you’ve tracked spending, you may be able to indentify money being spent that’s poorly aligned with your long-term goals. There may be some subscriptions or services that aren’t really being used or really are not necessary.

The other side of your savings rate (calculate yours here) is income. Can you increase your income? Negotiate a raise? Do some locum tenens work on the side?

The White Coat Investor recommends a savings rate of 20% of your gross income, which works out to maybe 30% to 35% of net for most of us. If you can elevate your savings rate to the point where you’re paying off debt or investing a dollar for every dollar you spend, you’ll be in even better shape before you know it.

Make It happen in 2019.

 

#6. Understand Your Taxes (and what you can do to lower them).

 

Do you understand the difference between your effective and marginal tax rates? Have you looked over your 1040 line by line? Do you understand the Section 199A 20% deduction for qualified business income?

When you understand how your taxes are calculated, you’ll be better equipped to pay less. Unfortunately, those of us who work for a living can only do so much to lower our taxes. Earned income will always be subject to taxation, especially when you have the earning power of a high-income professional.

However, you can impact your final tax bill. Here are a few of the ways I lower my taxes:

 

There are strategies for everyone to keep tax bills in check, but it’s particularly important for those not being paid as a W-2 employee to understand how the tax code works.

Take a look at additional posts I’ve published devoted to the topic of taxes.

 

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#7. Optimize your Debt Paydown Plans

 

If you’ve got debt, make plans to pay down those debts in a way that makes sense for you. Not all debt is all bad, of course, but debt-free is a good way to be, and if you’ve got high-interest debt, you’re going to want to focus on that first.

Credit card debt is a big no-no, and It’s going to be among the highest interest debt around. If you have credit card debt, figure out what you can do to pay it off as quickly as possible.

This may involve selling high-dollar items you’ve purchased or changing expensive plans you’ve made, but credit card debt should be viewed as a financial emergency.

Once you’ve figured out how quickly you can eliminate that debt, consider picking up a 0% APR balance transfer card. Don’t let that be an excuse to let the credit ride. Pay down the balance before the introductory rate rises. You don’t want to end up back in the same boat, which is more of a sinking ship than a boat that floats.

Student Loan debt is another common debt among physicians and other professionals. The interest can be moderately high, and the balances are often well into the six figures.

The New Year is a great time to review your plan to eliminate student loan debt, whether it’s via a forgiveness program such as PSLF or via a rapid paydown plan.

You’ll find dozens of educational articles and calculators, as well as the latest refinancing rates and cash-back offers on my Student Loan Resource page.

I’ve offered to donate $50 to the charity of your choice if you refinance via my resource page. Incredibly, only one person has taken me up on this offer thus far, but the offer still stands.

If you’d like a professional consult, Travis Hornsby and his crew have consulted on over $400 Million in student loans and they frequently save their clients tens of thousands of dollars over the life of their loans, with an average of $62,000 in found savings. Explore their options here.

Loans for automobiles, motorcycles, boats, RVs, etc… are not uncommon, either. Personally, I think a high-income professional ought to wait until they can afford to pay cash for these kind of things. A car payment does not need to be a line item on your budget. However, if you do take on debt for this stuff, make sure it’s low-interest and always pay on time.

Regarding mortgage debt, it’s not as “valuable” as it once was. With the new increased standard deduction, only about 10% of Americans will actually see a reduction in their taxes based on itemized deductions that include mortgage interest. Furthermore, interest rates and mortgage rates are on the rise.

You don’t have to make any more than your minimum mortgage payments, but you might want to add additional money to you monthly payments to pay down the principal faster.

We were 100% debt-free by the time I turned 40, and it is a great feeling. Eliminating low-interest debt isn’t always the monetarily optimal choice, but I have no regrets.

 

#8. Earn Easy Travel Rewards

 

There are a number of websites and forums devoted entirely to the world of credit card travel rewards. The amount of information can be overwhelming, leading to analysis by paralysis.

However, I’ve discovered that the Pareto principle definitely applies here. You can get at least 80% of the results with 20% of the effort.

There are a number of great offers on both travel reward and cash back cards. If you’re new to the game, I recommend starting with a Chase card that has solid perks and points that can be used for cash or often more lucratively for travel with one of many partners. The Chase Sapphire Preferred is a good option, with a $95 annual fee  and an offer of 60,000 points after meeting the minimum spend of $4,000 in three months. That’s worth $750 in travel when booking through the Chase portal and potentially more when transferring points to travel partners.

Chase Bank is a great place to start, because if you’ve picked up more than five cards in two years, Chase will typically reject your application for a new card, no matter how good your credit is.

To learn more about earning and redeeming rewards, visit my guide to Credit Cards for People Who Love Free Travel and Money.

To keep track of the cards you have, their perks, and the other cards available, download my updated credit card tracking spreadsheet, which is regularly updated.

 

Personal Credit Card Tracker

 

Finally, if you’ve got a small business, there’s a world of business cards available to you. I’ve recently reviewed some of the top business card options.

 

#9. Read a Personal Finance Book (or Five).

 

A frequent mid-career sentiment when it comes to money management is “I don’t know where to start.” I’ve written a two-part Investing Basics series, which is decent for a brief overview, but what you really need is a good book.

When I was in medical school, I read The Only Investment Guide You’ll Ever Need by Andrew Tobias. The paperback gave me good perspective and kept me from making expensive mistakes.

The best book available today for med students, residents and early-career physicians is The White Coat Investor. He’s got a great site, too, of course, but the book is well organized and can be read in a few short hours.

Dr. Cory S. Fawcett, a surgeon who retired in his mid-fifties, has written three financial books specifically for physicians, and I’ve reviewed each of them on this site.

 

Finally, a couple other good, quick reads I highly recommend are Jonathan Clements’ How to Think About Money, John Bogle’s Little Book of Common Sense Investing, and JL Collins’ Simple Path to Wealth.

With the background knowledge from one or more of these books, you’ll be able to better understand many of the blog posts you read and the questions and answers you see in various online forums.

 

 

Bonus (#9.5?): Join a Q&A Forum

 

I’ve learned a ton from reading threads on various online forums and more recently, Facebook Groups. I strongly recommend the following:

 

Join me — I frequent all of the above — and I promise you’ll learn a ton, too.

 

#10. Complete a Legacy Binder

 

I had to include this one because it’s high on our list. When a death occurs in the family, particularly when it’s unexpected, sorting out the finances can be a monumental challenge.

A legacy binder, or “In Case of Emergency” Binder will not only have information on insurance policies, brokerage and retirement accounts, but also how to access them, who to call, and where to find important documents.

Usernames and passwords for emails, social media accounts, and more are a part of this.

I’ve got a copy of Chelsea Brennan’s well-organized Legacy Binder, and it’s my intention to print it out and fill it in before the end of the month.

 

 

She’s recently made a few improvements based on initial feedback, and rather than raising the price, she’s offering a 20% discount with code NEWYEAR19 on the $29 product now through 1/7/2019 for those of you who want to make it a New Year’s Resolution to complete a binder of their own.

 


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Best wishes on making and keeping all financial and other New Year’s Resolutions in 2019!

What Resolutions have you made in 2019? How have you fared with prior New Year’s Resolutions?

Physician on FIRE has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Physician on FIRE and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers.

8 comments

  • Great tips. I’m definitely going to read more finance book this year. And its about time that I work on the legacy binder. Thanks for the reminder!

  • Subscribe to get more great content like this, an awesome spreadsheet, and more!
  • Good ideas, POF. We probably need to be more disciplined with tracking spending. That has not been our major strength lately.

    I also look forward to publishing my own book sometime in the first quarter of this year. That’s probably my biggest early New Year’s resolution.

    Happy New Year to you and your family!

    TPP

  • Michael S

    Great post!

    How do you account for crowdfunding and syndication investments on Personal Capital? I have not found a place where they fit in.

  • Happy 2019!

    It is funny how a lot of the personal finance bloggers are major procrastinators like myself 🙂 I too bought the In Case of Emergency Binder (actually using your affiliate link that very first day you mentioned it months ago) and found it to be super detailed and a great resource but I have yet to sit down and fill it out.

    Glad to see I’m not the only one to do so. It makes no sense to buy it and then not take advantage of it 🙂 So far I have won the odds of living till I fill it out.

    Personal Capital and my own excel spreadsheet are two of my biggest and favorite tools to know where I am financially.

    I do think like CME you have to keep up with finances as there are so many changes that happen. Tax codes change. Global policies change. What worked for one generation certainly won’t work for another.

    I have mentioned before, but I do keep track of 2 separate net worths (not complicated, I just have it all on one spreadsheet). One is my retirement portfolio which lists all the assets (including nonretirement ones) that I expect will provide cash flow when I quit work. The other is the whole shebang (house, 529 plans etc). I still don’t count jewelery and vehicles because, like you said, they tend to depreciate and it’s hard placing a value anyway.

  • Yeah, about that…. 17 hours in and still going strong 😉

  • Thanks for the great tips. I am honored by your faith in my books. To have you recommend eight books to read and three of them are mine is an awesome thing to wake up to on January first. Thanks for your support and for leading doctors to FIRE.

    Happy New Year

    Dr. Cory S. Fawcett
    Prescription for Financial Success

  • Burley McIntyre

    I’m curious why you bother to keep a separate spreadsheet when using Personal Capital as well. Seems much less time consuming and provides pretty solid information regarding asset allocation, expenses, etc. with essentially zero effort.

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